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FM spokesman: "Anti-CNN" website reflects Chinese people's condemnation(03/27/08)

 

   BEIJING, March 27 (Xinhua) -- The website "www.anti-CNN.com " reflects public condemnation of some Western media's "distorted" reports of the riots in Lhasa, capital of China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang said on Thursday.

    "It is purely spontaneous condemnation and criticism by the Chinese people toward some Western media's irresponsible reports which violated professional ethnics," Qin said at a regular press conference.

    Qin was responding to a question concerning "www.anti-CNN.com", which its creators say they launched to expose the Western media's biased coverage of unrest in Tibet.

    "What the Tibetan incident leaves us is a mirror which tells us the true colours of some in the international community," he said.

    It includes a photograph on the CNN news network website showing people running in front of a military truck. The original picture uploaded by Chinese Internet users, however, also shows rioters throwing stones at the truck.

    Tens of thousands of people from China and abroad have been angered by biased and dishonest reports about the riots in Tibet by some Western media, and answered calls to condemn Western media organizations for exaggerated and distorted reporting of the issue.

    The Information Office of China's State Council has arranged a three-day trip for an international delegation of 26 journalists from 19 media organizations from different countries and regions, such as The Associated Press from the United States, the Financial Times from Britain, the South China Morning Post from Hong Kong and Central News Agency from Taiwan.

    Lhasa is returning to normal after the March 14 unrest that was believed to be organized, premeditated and masterminded by the Dalai Lama group.

    The unrest, involving beating, smashing, ransacking and arson, led to the deaths of at least 18 civilians and one police officer. It also left 382 civilians and 241 police officers injured, businesses looted, and residences, shops and vehicles torched.

Editor: Yan Liang
 


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