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Chinese leaders' foreign tours boost world peace,development (02/23/09)

Visiting Chinese President Hu Jintao (L) talks with Saudi Arabian King Abdullah bin Abdul-Aziz during their meeting in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Feb. 10, 2009.

Visiting Chinese President Hu Jintao (L) talks with Saudi Arabian King Abdullah bin Abdul-Aziz during their meeting in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Feb. 10, 2009. (Xinhua/Rao Aimin)
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  BEIJING, Feb. 23 (Xinhua) -- The visits by Chinese leaders to developing nations in Africa, Latin America and Asia at the beginning of the Chinese lunar new year were highlighted by the international media and conveyed far-reaching significance to the world.

  Chinese President Hu Jintao concluded visits to four African nations and Saudi Arabia on Feb. 17, and Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping finished his tour to five Latin American nations and Malta on Feb. 22.

Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping (R) meets with Speaker of Jamaica's House of Representatives Delroy Chuck (L) and President of Jamaica's Senate Oswald Harding (C) in Kingston, capital of Jamaica, on Feb. 12, 2009.

Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping (R) meets with Speaker of Jamaica's House of Representatives Delroy Chuck (L) and President of Jamaica's Senate Oswald Harding (C) in Kingston, capital of Jamaica, on Feb. 12, 2009. (Xinhua/Huang Jingwen)
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  During the visits, made at a time when the effects of the international financial crisis is being felt worldwide, the Chinese leaders and leaders of the host countries enhanced political trust, promoted friendship, and reached consensus on strengthening economic and trade ties as well as deepening reciprocal cooperation.

  More than 20 agreements were signed between China and the five host nations during Hu's tour, covering fields such as trade, investment and infrastructure. Many bilateral agreements, aimed at boosting all-around partnerships in cooperation with Latin American nations, were also signed during Xi's trip.

  In the face of the global economic crisis, China, as the biggest developing country, joined hands with other developing countries to boost morale and rise united to deal with the challenges.

  It is noticeable that China adopted the active stance despite its own difficulties due to the crisis.

  In Africa, Hu pledged that China, within its ability, would continue to increase aid and grant debt relief to African countries and broaden trade and investments in the continent.

  The promise showed China's courageous and conscientious attitude and was highly appreciated by African countries. Tanzanian President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete noted that China is now the most popular partner of developing countries.

  In addition, China strengthened cooperation and coordinated action with developing countries on reform of the international financial system.

  Hu extended support for the African Union's participation in the G20 summit, called for more representation of developing nations in the international economic and financial fields, and stressed the need for the international community to be concerned about and try to minimize the suffering of developing countries, especially the least developed countries, in the current crisis.

  The views and stands, which reflected the appeals of developing countries, won broad support from leaders of the host countries.

  At this time of crisis, when adjustments and changes to the world order pattern pick up speed, the significance of China and other developing countries in the economy becomes ever more evident.

  China and other developing countries have always been sincere and supportive of one another politically, and trading complementarily to seek common economic development, has made them emerge in the international arena as one group.

  Especially in recent years, developing countries, represented by new economies, have been holding increasingly greater weight in the world economy.

  The current economic crisis has put almost all major developed economies into recession. At present, world economic growth is mainly fueled by such emerging economies as China, India and Brazil.

  Surely neither developed nor developing countries can handle the impact of the economic crisis alone in the current era of economic globalization, and the Chinese leaders' spring tours have served well the purpose of promoting coordination and cooperation among Asian, African and Latin American countries.

  Such reciprocal and win-win cooperation would be both conducive to an early exit from the ongoing financial crisis, and to helping steer the development of the world economic order in a more justified and sensible direction, and hence world peace, development and stability. 

 

 


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