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Taiwan - an Inalienable Part of China


There is only one China in the world, and Taiwan is part of China. The Government of the People's Republic of China is the sole legal government of China. This is the fact recognized by the United Nations and over 160 countries, including the United States of America which established diplomatic relations with China 20 years ago.

It was true that in 1912, Dr. Sun Yat-sen led a popular revolution that overthrew the corrupt Qing Dynasty and founded the Republic of China (not the so-called "Republic of China on Taiwan" ). What was also true is that in 1949, that Republic of China which had been ruled by a corrupt and despotic Kuomintang regime for 28 years was overthrown in another popular revolution. This is history, whether one likes it or not. Since then, China has been represented in the world by the People's Republic of China with its national government in Beijing, and the "Republic of China" has since become defunct.

The lingering civil war which was imposed on the Chinese people in late 1940s and more importantly the intervention by foreign forces against the reunification of China led to a temporary state of separation between the two sides of the Taiwan Straits after the People's Republic of China was founded. But the status of Taiwan as part of China's territory has never changed, nor has the Government of the People's Republic China ever given up its jurisdiction over Taiwan.

When China and the U.S. formally established diplomatic ties in 1979, the communiqu?had the following words: "The United States of America recognizes the Government of the People's Republic of China as the sole legal government of China. Within this context, the people of the United States will maintain cultural, commercial, and other unofficial relations with the people of Taiwan ... The Government of the United States of America acknowledges the Chinese position that there is but one China and Taiwan is part of China."

The Chinese Government does not object to the U.S. maintaining non-governmental economic and cultural relations with Taiwan. What we do oppose is U.S. conducting official exchanges with the Taiwan authorities. The dispatch of U.S. Energy Secretary to Taiwan and his meetings with Lee Teng-hui and other senior officials of Taiwan constitute a serious violation of the guiding principles enshrined in the three joint communiqué–Ÿ between the two countries and the U.S. own pledge of not having any official contact with Taiwan. It is only reasonable and entirely justifiable for us to express concern and lodge protest with the U.S. Government over its erroneous actions.

I am glad to see the tremendous progress made in China-U.S. relations in recent years, especially since the successful exchange of state visits by the two heads of state. These achievements have not come by easily. It is my hope that the two sides will keep up their efforts to build towards a constructive strategic partnership as it will serve not only the common interest of the two countries, but also peace, stability and prosperity in Asia-Pacific and the world at large.


Yu Shuning Spokesman of the Chinese Embassy in the United States of America

 


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